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Welcome to the UK Clinical Trials Gateway

Thank you for visiting the UK Clinical Trials Gateway. We hope it gives you a clear understanding of what is involved if you participate in a clinical trial. You can search this site in various ways to find trials relevant to you and contact researchers yourself.

But, before doing any of this, you may have questions about trials, what they are and how they work. Indeed, you may have come to this site because your doctor has invited you to join a trial but you want to know more before you decide.

Taking part in medical research is a big step. It can potentially deliver great benefits to you or a loved one but it may also involve some inconvenience or risk. This site includes plenty of information about what a trial involves and what you can expect if you take part (more here).

We hope the general information about trials is useful. You may find that individual trial records contain complex scientific and medical terms and are hard to understand. We are working to address this (more here) and hope that you are able to find out what you need from the contact named on the trial record or from your own doctor.

We continue to introduce and test new features on the site and welcome your feedback and comments.If you have any general questions about the UKCTG website or suggestions about how we can improve it, please feel free to contact us at ukctg@nihr.ac.uk.


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Click on a location to see the trials running.


Latest research findings


from the NIHR Dissemination Centre

Adding the extra antibiotic rifampicin did not improve cure rates after sepsis
Adding the antibiotic rifampicin did not improve cure rates or reduce deaths for people with bacterial blood infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus. It increased the risk of adverse reactions requiring a change in treatment and the chances of drug interactions. This NIHR-funded trial is the largest to date on adding rifampicin to standard antibiotic therapy. The study included 770 people in 29 UK hospitals. Half were assigned to 14 days of treatment with rifampicin on top of their existing antibiotic regime. Rifampicin could be either oral or intravenous.
17 April 2018

Lorazepam confirmed as first-line treatment for stopping prolonged seizures in children
Intravenous lorazepam is as effective as intravenous diazepam for stopping children’s tonic-clonic seizures in hospital. Lorazepam also results in fewer breathing problems than diazepam. Giving antiepileptic drugs intravenously generally stops seizures more quickly than giving the drugs buccally (in the cheek), intranasally (in the nose) or rectally. However, this effect can be cancelled out if administering the drug into the veins takes too long. Two of the 18 included trials were carried out in the UK, but they were all carried out in large children’s hospitals or departments similar to the UK. The new evidence confirms advice in the existing NICE guideline and also describes the current options regarding the routes and preparations used when it is difficult to secure intravenous access quickly.
17 April 2018

A school-based obesity prevention programme was ineffective
A school-based healthy lifestyle programme delivered to 6-7-year-old children and their parents made no difference to children’s weight, diet or activity levels. Around 1 in 4 remained overweight or obese. The NIHR-funded year-long programme was delivered in 54 primary schools in one region of England. Teachers were trained to provide an additional 30 minutes of physical activity a day and deliver cookery workshops with parents each term. It also included activities with a local football club, Aston Villa. Children in schools that took part were no less likely to be overweight or obese after 15 or 30 months, and their diet and exercise levels did not improve. Less than one in six schools managed to deliver the activity sessions as planned. The results are similar to another recent trial of a lifestyle programme delivered to 9-10-year-olds. Both suggest that changes to reverse the tide of childhood obesity will have to take place in wider society, not just in schools, to have the desired effect.
10 April 2018

More research news on clinical trials

Better healthcare starts with you

The UK Clinical Trials Gateway is designed to help you participate in clinical trials running in the UK.

Read more