Better healthcare starts with you
what is UKCTG?
Try searching for a clinical trial   You can search by condition or relevant keywords
in

Welcome to the UK Clinical Trials Gateway

Thank you for visiting the UK Clinical Trials Gateway. We hope it gives you a clear understanding of what is involved if you participate in a clinical trial. If you decide to sign up so that researchers can contact you about trials that might be suitable, you can do so here. You can also search this site in various ways to find trials relevant to you and contact researchers yourself.

But, before doing any of this, you may have questions about trials, what they are and how they work. Indeed, you may have come to this site because your doctor has invited you to join a trial but you want to know more before you decide.

Taking part in medical research is a big step. It can potentially deliver great benefits to you or a loved one but it may also involve some inconvenience or risk. This site includes plenty of information about what a trial involves and what you can expect if you take part (more here).

We hope the general information about trials is useful. You may find that individual trial records contain complex scientific and medical terms and are hard to understand. We are working to address this (more here) and hope that you are able to find out what you need from the contact named on the trial record or from your own doctor.

We continue to introduce and test new features on the site and welcome your feedback and comments.If you have any general questions about the UKCTG website or suggestions about how we can improve it, please feel free to contact us at ukctg@nihr.ac.uk.


Find trials near you.


Click on a location to see the trials running.


Latest research findings


from the NIHR Dissemination Centre

Dexamethasone before bowel surgery reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting
A single dose of dexamethasone given at the time of anaesthesia for bowel surgery reduced vomiting in the next 24 hours, with no increase in complications. Thirteen people need to be treated to prevent one extra episode of vomiting. Dexamethasone (a steroid) is one of several drugs recommended for patients at moderate and high risk of postoperative nausea and vomiting. It isn’t widely used in bowel surgery. In this large UK-based trial, treating eight people also prevented one person requesting additional anti-sickness drugs. There was no increase in adverse events, and patients given dexamethasone returned to eating quicker. Postoperative nausea and vomiting can delay recovery, so this finding has the potential to improve outcomes for patients and reduce NHS costs.
08 August 2017

Stop smoking services can work for people in treatment or recovery from substance misuse disorders
Providing stop smoking services to people with substance misuse disorders increases the numbers of people who stop smoking by about 10% without reducing the rates of abstinence from drugs or alcohol. Combined drug treatment and counselling showed the best result though pharmacotherapy alone was also successful. However counselling alone was not beneficial. This Cochrane review included trials of people who were already either in treatment or recovery for drug or alcohol misuse in a variety of settings. Those in the treatment groups were given counselling, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of both to reduce smoking, and compared to usual care or placebo. The type of substance misuse disorder was not related to success rates. Smoking rates amongst people dependent on alcohol or drugs are high. Treatment to also reduce smoking in this group is rare as it has been thought that adding stopping smoking treatments will reduce the effectiveness of substance misuse treatments. This is not the case, and offering help to stop smoking can be safely provided.
08 August 2017

Talking therapy given by parents shows promise for childhood anxiety disorders
Brief guided cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered by parents was as good as a commonly used treatment, delivered by a therapist, in improving anxiety levels in children. Anxiety continued to improve after the end of treatment and by six months about 70% had recovered. The brief CBT was potentially the more cost-effective option. This NIHR-funded trial compared recovery from a range of common anxiety disorders in children aged five to 12 following these brief psychological treatments. CBT was delivered by parents instructed and supported in its use by a mental health worker. It was compared with a treatment commonly used in the NHS, a solution-focused brief therapy delivered directly by a trained therapist. Brief interventions such as these have the potential to improve outcomes at a reasonable cost for children with this common debilitating condition.
08 August 2017

More research news on clinical trials

Better healthcare starts with you

The UK Clinical Trials Gateway is designed to help you participate in clinical trials running in the UK.

Read more