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Welcome to the UK Clinical Trials Gateway

Thank you for visiting the UK Clinical Trials Gateway. We hope it gives you a clear understanding of what is involved if you participate in a clinical trial. You can search this site in various ways to find trials relevant to you and contact researchers yourself.

But, before doing any of this, you may have questions about trials, what they are and how they work. Indeed, you may have come to this site because your doctor has invited you to join a trial but you want to know more before you decide.

Taking part in medical research is a big step. It can potentially deliver great benefits to you or a loved one but it may also involve some inconvenience or risk. This site includes plenty of information about what a trial involves and what you can expect if you take part (more here).

We hope the general information about trials is useful. You may find that individual trial records contain complex scientific and medical terms and are hard to understand. We are working to address this (more here) and hope that you are able to find out what you need from the contact named on the trial record or from your own doctor.

We continue to introduce and test new features on the site and welcome your feedback and comments.If you have any general questions about the UKCTG website or suggestions about how we can improve it, please feel free to contact us at ukctg@nihr.ac.uk.


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Click on a location to see the trials running.


Latest research findings


from the NIHR Dissemination Centre

Intensive lifestyle interventions can help obese young people lose weight
Obese children and adolescents can lose up to seven pounds over six to 12 months when they engage in at least 52 hours of behaviour-based lifestyle interventions. Minimal benefit was seen with shorter contact time, with less than 25 hours ineffective. The control group gained weight. Rising obesity in the young is a global concern, which may lead to high rates of obesity-related diseases in adulthood. This review identified trials covering various weight management strategies. Lifestyle-based-interventions with sufficient contact time – as recommended by UK guidelines – showed clear benefits with no evidence of harms. Investing in effective strategies to manage child obesity will ultimately save healthcare costs. Behaviour-based support should now be assessed for long-term weight loss and maintenance. The evidence is still lacking whether universal child screening for obesity should be performed in the UK.
19 September 2017

Self-guided therapy for people with obsessive-compulsive disorder did not improve symptoms
Offering people book-based or computer-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) whilst on a waiting list for therapist-led therapy did not improve their obsessive-compulsive symptoms when assessed after three or 12 months. However, these low-intensity interventions may reduce the likelihood of people taking up therapist-led CBT. This NIHR-funded trial included 473 adults with moderate to severe obsessive-compulsive disorder who were already waiting to receive CBT. Issues with the uptake of the low-intensity interventions and therapist-led therapy may have affected results but probably reflect the challenges of engaging people with these symptoms into therapy. There is a possibility that the book- or computer-based therapies could be effective in people with milder symptoms, but it is unlikely to be the best strategy for people with moderate to severe symptoms.
19 September 2017

Heel casts do not improve heel ulcers in diabetes
Fibreglass casts moulded to the heel did not improve heel ulcers in people with diabetes when added to usual ulcer care. Ulcers healed within six months in 44% of people using casts compared with 37% without which was not a statistically significant difference. Foot ulcers are a common complication of diabetes, and heel ulcers are particularly difficult to treat. Based on the success of casts for treating ulcers elsewhere on the foot this trial was designed to test the effect and cost-effectiveness of using a similar approach for heel ulcers. This NIHR-funded trial indicates that specially-moulded heel casts do not improve healing rates or pain, and were not a good use of NHS resources compared with usual care. Uncertainty remains over the optimal approach for managing heel ulcers in people with diabetes.
19 September 2017

More research news on clinical trials

Better healthcare starts with you

The UK Clinical Trials Gateway is designed to help you participate in clinical trials running in the UK.

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