Better healthcare starts with you
what is UKCTG?
Try searching for a clinical trial   You can search by condition or relevant keywords
in

Welcome to the UK Clinical Trials Gateway

Thank you for visiting the UK Clinical Trials Gateway. We hope it gives you a clear understanding of what is involved if you participate in a clinical trial. You can search this site in various ways to find trials relevant to you and contact researchers yourself.

But, before doing any of this, you may have questions about trials, what they are and how they work. Indeed, you may have come to this site because your doctor has invited you to join a trial but you want to know more before you decide.

Taking part in medical research is a big step. It can potentially deliver great benefits to you or a loved one but it may also involve some inconvenience or risk. This site includes plenty of information about what a trial involves and what you can expect if you take part (more here).

We hope the general information about trials is useful. You may find that individual trial records contain complex scientific and medical terms and are hard to understand. We are working to address this (more here) and hope that you are able to find out what you need from the contact named on the trial record or from your own doctor.

We continue to introduce and test new features on the site and welcome your feedback and comments.If you have any general questions about the UKCTG website or suggestions about how we can improve it, please feel free to contact us at ukctg@nihr.ac.uk.


Find trials near you.


Click on a location to see the trials running.


Latest research findings


from the NIHR Dissemination Centre

Alternative sedative reduces the risk of acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery
The sedative drug dexmedetomidine can reduce the risk of acute kidney injury when given during non-emergency cardiac surgery. Trial participants who received dexmedetomidine were a third less likely to develop acute kidney injury than those receiving placebo or other treatments. There was no difference in mortality or length of hospital stay. This systematic review identified 10 studies of 1,575 participants. Surgical procedures included coronary artery bypass grafting with or without valve surgery and aortic vascular surgery. Dexmedetomidine was given before or shortly after surgery. Most participants were followed up for the duration of their hospital stay, or for 12 to 30 days. Many strategies are currently used to reduce the risk of kidney injury following cardiac surgery. This study provides some evidence that dexmedetomidine may help reduce this risk, but larger trials are needed before it can be routinely recommended.
10 July 2018

One week of steroids may be as effective as two weeks in managing severe COPD
A shorter course of steroids lasting 3 to 7 days appears as effective as the recommended 7 to 14-day standard treatment for managing a flare-up of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This update to an earlier Cochrane review looked at randomised clinical trials comparing a short course (7 days or fewer) with a longer course (7 to 14 days) of steroids given by mouth or injection. All participants had been admitted to hospital, but none required mechanical ventilation. The evidence suggests that shorter courses of steroids could be given to people with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease where there are concerns about side effects. However, the research was limited by small study sizes and including only 582 people in total. Further research is needed to determine the optimum duration of steroid treatment in flare-ups of mild or moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
10 July 2018

Fish oil supplements are ineffective for treating dry eyes
Omega-3 fatty acids or ‘fish oil’ supplements are no more effective than inactive olive oil capsules for relieving dry eye disease. Some patients take fish oil supplements for this common problem, but this new evidence suggests that they consider alternatives. Dry eye disease is a common long-term inflammatory condition causing discomfort, and disturbances including blurred vision. Treatment of symptoms includes using artificial tears. Although guidelines recognise the lack of existing evidence for fish oil supplements, people continue to use them on the advice of health professionals. This US-based trial did not find a difference on several measures compared with placebo over one year of follow up. The trial was based on community patients, so is likely to apply to people visiting their GP for help with dry eye disease, or who buy supplements over the counter. Practitioners can now confidently tell their patients that new evidence suggests this widely available supplement is no better than taking olive oil for relieving dry eye symptoms.
03 July 2018

More research news on clinical trials

Better healthcare starts with you

The UK Clinical Trials Gateway is designed to help you participate in clinical trials running in the UK.

Read more