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Welcome to the UK Clinical Trials Gateway

Thank you for visiting the UK Clinical Trials Gateway. We hope it gives you a clear understanding of what is involved if you participate in a clinical trial. If you decide to sign up so that researchers can contact you about trials that might be suitable, you can do so here. You can also search this site in various ways to find trials relevant to you and contact researchers yourself.

But, before doing any of this, you may have questions about trials, what they are and how they work. Indeed, you may have come to this site because your doctor has invited you to join a trial but you want to know more before you decide.

Taking part in medical research is a big step. It can potentially deliver great benefits to you or a loved one but it may also involve some inconvenience or risk. This site includes plenty of information about what a trial involves and what you can expect if you take part (more here).

We hope the general information about trials is useful. You may find that individual trial records contain complex scientific and medical terms and are hard to understand. We are working to address this (more here) and hope that you are able to find out what you need from the contact named on the trial record or from your own doctor.

We continue to introduce and test new features on the site and welcome your feedback and comments.If you have any general questions about the UKCTG website or suggestions about how we can improve it, please feel free to contact us at ukctg@nihr.ac.uk.


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Click on a location to see the trials running.


Latest research findings


from the NIHR Dissemination Centre

A blood test threshold for diagnosing heart failure in general practice is reviewed
The cut-off level for the blood test NTproBNP appears to provide the best balance of detecting true cases while excluding false positives when lowered to 125 pg/ml. The trial supported by the NIHR included a sample of people presenting to their GP with suspected heart failure. It aimed to see which method was best for identifying those who needed referral: the blood test alone; clinical decision rules based on clinical symptoms; or the combination of both. The blood test alone at the 125 pg/ml cut-off correctly identified 94% of people with heart failure but led to 50% of peoplewho did not have heart failurebeing referred for further investigation. This threshold is lower than the level currently recommended by NICE (≥400 pg/ml), which could miss up to one in five people. Clinical decision rules used alone or in combination with the blood test did not improve detection rates. However, the lower cut-off would also mean that one in two people without heart failure would be referred for unnecessary expensive tests. A cost-effectiveness analysis is being prepared, which will enable decision-makers to balance the effectiveness of the different approaches.
03 May 2017

Repetitive task training can help recovery after stroke
Following a stroke, people who received repetitive task training showed greater improvements in performing functional tasks, such as picking up a cup, standing up and walking. These improvements were sustained for up to six months. Disability following stroke is common, affecting around half of all stroke survivors. This NIHR-funded review of over thirty trials found that repetitive task training provided small gains in arm and leg function, balance and walking distance (about 35 metres). We do not yet know the optimum number of sessions, or the ideal duration or intensity. However, it is a versatile and relatively easy intervention which can be delivered by physiotherapists/occupational therapists in groups, individually, in hospital, in the community or at home. Depending on the nature of the exercise, there is also potential for people to continue to practice on their own or with carer support. This review shows that it can help people to improve functionality and mobility and should be considered as part of routine rehabilitation, in line with national guidance.
25 April 2017

Fortified donor breast milk led to similar development for very-low-birthweight babies compared with formula milk
Providing very-low-birthweight babies with fortified human donor breast milk made no difference to their developmental neurological outcomes at 18 months compared with giving formula. This randomised controlled trial looked at 363 babies with birth weights of less than 1500g in neonatal intensive care units in Canada. When the mother’s own milk supply was limited, the babies were given either nutrient-enriched donor breast milk or formula developed for premature babies. There was no difference in their understanding, language, or ability to manipulate objects at 18 months. This finding might help to reduce anxiety about providing formula in areas where donor breast milk is difficult to obtain. However, the research was focussed on developmental outcomes rather than potential effects of donor breast milk on other risks of prematurity, such as immunity or gastrointestinal complications. This trial will continue to collect data to re-assess developmental outcomes when the children reach five years of age.
18 April 2017

More research news on clinical trials

Better healthcare starts with you

The UK Clinical Trials Gateway is designed to help you participate in clinical trials running in the UK.

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