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Welcome to the UK Clinical Trials Gateway

Thank you for visiting the UK Clinical Trials Gateway. We hope it gives you a clear understanding of what is involved if you participate in a clinical trial. You can search this site in various ways to find trials relevant to you and contact researchers yourself.

But, before doing any of this, you may have questions about trials, what they are and how they work. Indeed, you may have come to this site because your doctor has invited you to join a trial but you want to know more before you decide.

Taking part in medical research is a big step. It can potentially deliver great benefits to you or a loved one but it may also involve some inconvenience or risk. This site includes plenty of information about what a trial involves and what you can expect if you take part (more here).

We hope the general information about trials is useful. You may find that individual trial records contain complex scientific and medical terms and are hard to understand. We are working to address this (more here) and hope that you are able to find out what you need from the contact named on the trial record or from your own doctor.

We continue to introduce and test new features on the site and welcome your feedback and comments.If you have any general questions about the UKCTG website or suggestions about how we can improve it, please feel free to contact us at ukctg@nihr.ac.uk.


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Click on a location to see the trials running.


Latest research findings


from the NIHR Dissemination Centre

Exercise improves symptoms and function for people with ankylosing spondylitis
People with ankylosing spondylitis showed improvement in their symptoms and their ability to perform day-to-day tasks when they did more exercise. Symptom and function scores improved by almost one point on a 10-point scale after 3 to 12 weeks of exercise. Ankylosing spondylitis is a type of arthritis which mainly affects the spine, causing pain, stiffness and progressive fusion of the spine. There have been recent advances in pharmacological treatment, and it was uncertain whether exercise along with modern drug treatment has useful benefits. This review pooled the results of eight trials comparing different types of exercise with education or no exercise. People’s symptoms and ability to perform daily activities improved regardless of whether they were receiving new drug treatments. The functional improvements shown in this research and the potential to prolong independence and working life for the most severely affected might also be another important reason to maintain activity.
21 November 2017

Blood pressure self-monitoring works best when people are well-supported
People with high blood pressure are more likely to have their blood pressure controlled after 12 months if they self-monitor and receive counselling by telephone compared with usual monitoring in the clinic. When people were asked to self-monitor their blood pressure with no additional support, it was no better than getting their blood pressure measured in a clinic. This NIHR-funded review of 25 trials found that self-monitoring with counselling by telephone reduced systolic blood pressure by about 6mmHg. Self-monitoring became less effective as the amount of healthcare support and education decreased. It is not clear what the optimum frequency of checks is, but involving people in monitoring their condition is in line with NICE guidelines. The review did not look at the costs involved in providing the additional support. The accuracy and maintenance of home blood pressure machines also need to be taken into account, but the results look promising.
21 November 2017

Comprehensive assessment when older people are in hospital improves their chances of getting home and living independently
Older people who received comprehensive geriatric assessment when in hospital were slightly more likely to be living in their own homes one year later. Sixty percent were discharged to independent living compared with 56% receiving standard ward care. People who had received this proper assessment were also 20% less likely to be in a nursing home after three months or more. Older people often have multiple complex conditions combined with frailty and are more likely to lose independence after illness. Comprehensive geriatric assessment is a careful review by a multidisciplinary specialist team of people’s medical, functional, mental and social capabilities. It aims to improve recovery and enable people to maintain function and independence. This updated Cochrane review covered 29 trials comparing this assessment with routine care for people over 65, excluding those with stroke and orthopaedic conditions. It may save NHS resources, but the quality of evidence was too low to assess this reliably. This assessment is not carried out in all hospitals, and the mode of delivery varies. Research has yet to answer how best to deliver this assessment to those most in need.
21 November 2017

More research news on clinical trials

Better healthcare starts with you

The UK Clinical Trials Gateway is designed to help you participate in clinical trials running in the UK.

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